Advice for Life September 22,2016

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Studies suggest that the omega-3 in fish oil can provide plenty of possible benefits to the human body. In general, fats have a bad reputation, so it’s important to remember that not all fat is bad! There are three different types of fatty acids: saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are comprised of the omega-6 and omega-3 families, have received a lot of attention in recent years because they are considered to be “good” fats. Since our bodies can’t make these fats due to a lack of the appropriate enzymes and they are necessary for numerous body functions, including growth, reproduction, vision, and brain development, we must get them through food. Omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids are therefore collectively referred to as essential fatty acids and are one of the four building blocks of good health along with multivitamins, Vitamin D, and probiotics/greens. A deficiency in essential nutrients, whether it’s vitamin A, vitamin C, zinc, or essential fatty acids, will promote disease.

The principal omega-6 fatty acid is called linoleic acid, and it is found in animal fats and vegetable oils, such as corn, safflower, sesame, soybean, and sunflower oils. Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is another omega-6 fatty acid that can be found in a wide variety of common foods, notably organ meats. It is also found in the plant seed oils of evening primrose, blackcurrant, and borage oils. Finally, dietary arachidonic acid (AA) comes primarily through the consumption of eggs and animal fats. There are two major types of omega-3 fatty acids in our diets: those found in plant-based sources and those that come from fish, seafood, and algae. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is found in green leafy vegetables, seaweed, and some nuts and seeds. Some of the top food sources of ALA include flax, chia, and hemp. ALA is also found to a lesser extent in some vegetable oils.

The other type of omega-3 fatty acid in our diet is referred to as long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. This includes eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which come from marine-based sources, like fish and algae. North Americans typically consume considerable amounts of ALA daily. On the other hand, EPA and DHA are consumed at much lower levels. EPA and DHA are generally absent from plant food sources rich in ALA.  While the body can partially convert ALA to EPA and DHA, humans have poor abilities to perform this conversion, converting <5% of consumed ALA to EPA + DHA. This is important because although flax may contain a high amount of omega-3 fatty acids by weight, <5% of the ALA is converted to EPA and DHA. Therefore, consuming direct sources of EPA and DHA have a more potent effect on raising these long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels within the body than simply consuming high levels of ALA. The most direct way of providing EPA and DHA for the body is through the consumption of fish or algal oils.

Advice for Life, September 8, 2016

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When travelling outside Canada, you may be at risk for a number of vaccine preventable illnesses. You should consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel. This is an opportunity to:

  • review      your immunization history
  • make      sure your provincial/territorial vaccination schedule is up-to-date
  • discuss      any trip-related health concerns you may have
  • assess      your needs based on where you plan to travel and what you plan to do

You may need additional vaccinations depending on your age, planned travel activities and local conditions. Preventing disease through vaccination is a lifelong process.

Some countries require proof that you have received a yellow fever vaccination before allowing you to enter the country. Consult an embassy or consulate of your destination country in Canada for up-to-date information on its entry and exit requirements before you travel abroad. Other countries may require you to have been vaccinated for yellow fever if you have passed through an area where yellow fever may occur. Proof of vaccination must be documented on an International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis. You must carry the original certificate with you. In Canada, the vaccination is only given at designated yellow fever vaccination centres such as Grand Avenue Pharmacy Travel Clinic. Carry your original International Certificate of Vaccination or Prophylaxis with you while you travel. Leave a copy of the certificate at home. Also, you should carry copies of your family’s immunization records while you travel and leave the originals at home.

To book your travel consultation call Grand Avenue Pharmacy at 403-932-2500 or book online at www.grandavenuepharmacy.ca

Advice for Life, August 25, 2016

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Healthy Hormones

Hormones travel through your blood stream carrying chemical messages to tissues and organs, telling them what to do. They are made by the endocrine glands which include the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid and adrenal glands and the pancreas. Men’s hormones are produced in the testes and women’s in the ovaries. Hormones work slowly but steadily and affect growth and development, reproduction, sexual function, mood and metabolism.

They can also influence how the immune system works and modify a person’s behaviour. Hormones need to be balanced. Too much or too little can cause distinct changes that affect your entire body. Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that can affect hormone balance. They can interfere with hormones that are on their way to binding with their receptors, which can wreak havoc and alter the development in an embryo or change how they should function in an adult body.

Estrogen dominance is a common hormonal imbalance that can occur in women. It is characterized by excess estrogen and low progesterone in the body. Common female estrogen dominant conditions include PMS, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids, cystic breasts, heavy periods, hormonal acne and severe menopausal symptoms among others.

Healthy Hormones is an all natural formula designed to promote healthy estrogen detoxification and relief of PMS. It contains a clinically significant 400 mg daily dose of indole-3-carbinol which research shows to improve the liver’s ability to detoxify harmful estrogens. minimum of 3 months. Periodic intervals of abstinence (2 week breaks before continuing) is recommended for long-term use. Other key nutrients and herbs in the formula work synergistically to ease PMS and balance estrogen and progesterone.


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Advice for Life August 18, 2016

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With our dry spring we did not see mosquitoes in May and June, but the soggy summer has allowed them to join us for a late summer reunion! The risk of becoming infected with the West Nile virus is greatest during mosquito season which can start as early as mid-April and last as late as October. Here are some suggestions to help you avoid mosquitoes:

  • Apply a bug repellent that      contains no more than 30% DEET to your clothes:
    • Adults can also apply 30%       (or less) DEET-containing repellent to any exposed skin, but children       should use the least concentrated DEET products (less than 10%).
    • Children should not have       DEET-containing repellent on their face or hands.
    • Children under 2 years of       age should usually not have DEET applied to clothes or skin. In       situations where there is a high risk of complications from insect bites,       repellent containing 10% or less DEET may be applied once daily for       children aged 6 months to 2 years. Infants under 6 months of age should       not have DEET applied to their skin or clothes.
    • Children between the ages       of 2 and 12 years can use insect repellent containing less than 10% of       DEET - it can be applied up to 3 times per day.
    • Do not apply DEET to open       wounds or to skin that is irritated or sunburned.
    • Avoid getting DEET in the       eyes (for this reason, it is recommended not to put DEET on children's       hands) - flush the eyes immediately with water if this happens.
    • There is no data to suggest       that DEET is harmful for pregnant or breast-feeding women. However, these       women may want to use non-chemical methods (such as protective clothing       and avoiding times and places where mosquitoes are likely to be present).
  • A new repellent out this year is DEET free. PiACTIVE – with 20% icaridin – is the first 12 Hour Insect Repellent on the Canadian Market,  is a Health Canada registered product and protects against Mosquitoes, Black Flies, and Ticks. Numerous health authorities including the World Health Organization recommend insect repellents containing Icaridin as a first line of defense when travelling to tropical climate regions, as well as for children 12 years and younger. PiACTIVE can be applied and re-applied, worry free, to children 6 months and older, when used as directed.
  • Wear light-coloured clothes,      including long-sleeved shirts and pants. Mosquitoes tend to be attracted      to dark-coloured clothes.
  • Minimize your time outside      from dusk to dawn, which are peak periods when mosquitoes are most active.      Enjoy the summer weather inside a screened-in patio or enclosure during      these hours.
  • Natural oil-based repellents      using plant-based ingredients. Oil of lemon eucalyptus has been found to      be as effective as DEET when used at similar strengths. Other plant-based      repellents, such as citronella or soybean oil, may be used. Keep in mind      that they are not as effective as chemical-based repellents, that products      containing essential oils need to be tested for skin sensitivity, and that      they need to be applied frequently.
  • Grand Avenue Pharmacy has many      natural products in stock that you may want to try instead of the chemical      based repellents. Mozi-Q is an oral (yes, you take it by mouth) repellent      which you chew and starts to work within 30 minutes of ingesting and lasts      3-5 hours. It is a homeopathic       remedy that has no side effects and is safe for children.

Advice For Life, August 11, 2016

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We are fully into summer vacations – here are some helpful lists to keep you safe and healthy while travelling.

Nonpharmacologic preventive recommendations for travellers

Concern Minimizing risk
Malaria

• use   up to 30% DEET insect repellents between dusk and dawn when outdoors

• sleep   protected by bed net treated with pyrethroids (permethrins)

• wear   light-coloured trousers and long-sleeved shirts at dusk

Traveller’s   Diarrhea

• “Boil   it, cook it, peel it or leave it”

• Drink   purified water or commercially bottled beverages

• Avoid   ice, salads, re-heated foods, uncooked shellfish, street vendors

• Wash   hands frequently, especially before eating or drinking

• Drink   plenty of liquids to prevent dehydration should you become ill

Safety   Risks

• Apply   sunblock with a minimum SPF of 30; apply half an hour prior to using an   insect repellent

•   Always practice safe sex (e.g., use a condom) to prevent sexually transmitted   diseases

• Avoid   swimming in fresh water as it may contain a parasite causing schistosomiasis

• Wear   a body belt (rather than carry a wallet or purse) and leave valuables and   traveller’s cheques in a hotel safe

• Keep   essential medications and supplies in your carry-on luggage; a copy of a   doctor’s prescription and/or certificate to possess needles and syringes is   highly recommended

Basic Medications

• pain or fever symptoms: acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen; • stomach upset or diarrhea symptoms: loperamide, oral rehydration packets, laxative, antacid; throat or respiratory symptoms: antihistamine, decongestant, cough suppressant, throat lozenges; skin irritation symptoms: antifungal/antibacterial ointment or cream, aloe gel, mild corticosteroid; eye irritation symptoms: saline or hydrocolloid eye drops

Basic First Aid Products

• adhesive band-aid assortment; disposable gloves; sterile gauze and adhesive tape; elastic bandages for sprains; moleskin for blisters; skin closure strips; antiseptics; cotton swabs; digital thermometer

Advice for Life, July 28, 2016

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CanPrev Adult Multi

Basic nutritional needs are covered by the food you eat, but taking a premium vitamin and mineral supplement is like having an extra insurance policy for your diet and immune protection.

Our health would be compromised without the necessary vitamins and minerals. They keep our cells strong and our organs functioning properly, help fight infection, regulate metabolism, help form bone and tissue and convert fat and carbohydrates into energy. Taking antibiotic, cardiac, diabetic, diuretic and gastrointestinal medications can deplete our bodies of important vitamins and minerals. We need to make sure we’re replacing them with a high potency, professional grade supplement like CanPrev’s Adult Multi.

Adult Multi is a comprehensive formula made for both men and women. It provides a full range of vitamins and minerals in therapeutic dosages and bioavailable forms for rapid absorption and utilization. Adult Multi is iron free for those who don’t require iron supplementation. Make Adult Multi your daily policy for maintaining best health.

Each capsule contains

Vitamin A (acetate) 2500IU/750mcg
Beta carotene (natural) 1000IU/600mcg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 100mg
Vitamin D (cholecalciferol) 500IU/12.5mcg
Vitamin E (d-alpha, natural) 50IU/33.5mgAT
Vitamin K1 (phytonadione) 60mcg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine HCL) 25mg
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 25mg
Vitamin B3 (niacinamide) 25mg
Vitamin B5 (D-pantothenic acid) 25mg
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5-phosphate) 25mg
Biotin 50mcg
Folate (folic acid) 400mcg
Vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin) 250mcg
Calcium (citrate) 40mg
Chromium (chromium polynicotinate) 50mcg
Copper (copper citrate) 500mcg
Iodine (laminaria digitata/ascophyllum nodosum) 100mcg
Magnesium (magnesium bisglycinate) 10mg
Manganese (Manganese citrate) 500mcg
Molybdenum (sodium molybdate) 15mcg
Potassium (potassium citrate) 10mg
Selenium (selenium yeast) 50mcg
Vanadium (vanadyl sulfate) 15mcg
Zinc (Zinc citrate) 5mg
Choline (choline bitartrate) 10mg
Inositol 10mg
Lutein (marigold extract) 3mg

Advice for Life, July 21,2016

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There is a common myth that if a person tans well, they’re

protected from the sun’s harmful rays. Not true! While it is

true that fairhaired, blue-eyed people are most prone to

burning, and therefore are more susceptible

to the sun’s rays, even “healthy” tans are really just damage

control - they’re your body’s way of trying to protect itself from

the sun. But the damage is already done and can’t be reversed.

Years of sun worshipping, be it outside or in a tanning salon,

will eventually show up later on in life as wrinkles, poor skin

elasticity, and possibly skin cancer. The sun, however, is also

very important to our health. It provides us with vitamin D

(which we need for our bones), and it can lift our spirits. As

with most good things, moderation and good sense are the

keys. The goal is to have fun outside but to stay safe at the

same time.

Here are some basic rules: Cover up whenever possible. A

longer cotton skirt, for example, might feel cooler on a hot day

than a pair of shorts, and will help guard you from the sun.

Hats keep the sun’s rays off the scalp, face, and

back of the neck, prime areas for skin cancer. A good hat will

also shelter and protect your eyes from the sun’s powerful

rays. Apply sunscreen 20 minutes before you go out, even if

the sun doesn’t seem particularly strong. Damaging ultraviolet

rays can penetrate clouds, so don’t take a chance. Always

apply sunscreen with a minimum SPF (sun protection factor) of

15. Be sure to follow the directions closely and reapply the

sunscreen on a regular basis throughout the day, especially

after you’ve been swimming or sweating. Avoid the sun when

it’s at its peak. It’s strongest between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., so use

that time to do activities indoors if possible. Physical (mineral) sunscreens tend to be better tolerated by most skin types because the chemical filters used in chemical sunscreens can be irritating for many people. However, physical sunscreens tend to leave a white cast or white streaks after application and don’t offer as much UVA protection compared to chemical sunscreens. Physical sunscreens are also a bit thicker so they may be more difficult to apply. Since they each have their pros and cons, many of today's sunscreens contain both physical and chemical UV filters. Grand Avenue Pharmacy carries five full lines of natural sunscreens.

Advice for Life, July 14, 2016

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Get off to the right start of Healthy Foot Care

Foot care is important at all ages. Being kind to your can help keep you mobile and pain-free, so you can continue to enjoy your favorite activities like walking, shopping, working in the yard and staying active. Being proactive about the health of your feet includes keeping them clean and dry, flexible, selecting the right shoes, and considering orthotic inserts. Older adults with diabetes should take special care of their feet to help promote healthy blood flow and minimize injury.  Caring for your feet every day will help you avoid problems like blisters, corns, callouses or athlete’s foot. According to the Institute for Preventive Foot Health, there are seven things you should do for healthy feet.

  1. Wash and thoroughly dry your feet for good hygiene.
  2. Wear a fresh, clean pair of socks and change them daily.
  3. Keep the insides and outsides of your shoes clean.
  4. Rotate your shoes — don’t wear the same pair two days in a row. (Fungus)
  5. Wear properly fitted shoes.
  6. Avoid going barefoot, particularly in public areas.
  7. Inspect your feet for bumps, blisters, sores, cracked skin, painful areas and other problems.

You should also care for your toenails regularly, and trim them at least every two weeks. Avoid ingrown nails and other issues, according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, by trimming your nails straight across (not curved) and at an adequate length.  Get off on the right foot by starting a healthy foot care routine today to prevent many issues that ail aging feet. Your feet are the essential foundation for the rest of your body and having healthy feet is the first step toward having a healthy body as you age.  Make an appointment with Pepita Wilson -Gicuhi  RN,CHN  at www.grandavenuepharmacy or call (403) 932-2500 , home visits call (403) 470-3668. Book for Foot Care,  Reflexology, or Ionic Foot Bath Detox today.

Advice For Life, July 7, 2016

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With summer travel season upon us it is a good time to check your vaccination

records if you are heading out to an exotic location. Travel consultations at Grand

Avenue Travel Clinic can be booked at 403-932-2500 or online at

www.grandavenuepharmacy.ca The table below lists the most common vaccines

available for travel.

                                         Common Travel Vaccines

Vaccine Description Onset of protective   effect
Cholera/ETEC   traveller’s diarrhea (Dukoral) Oral, inactivated Vibrio   cholerae; recombinant, non-toxic cholera toxin B 1 week after the   second dose (ETEC)
Hepatitis A (various) Formaldehyde-inactivated   hepatitis A adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide Maximum effect four   weeks after a single dose
Hepatitis B (various) Surface antigen,   inactive adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide using recombinant DNA technology Full immunity granted   after 3 doses; refer patient to pharmacist for accelerated schedule

Japanese Encephalitis

(JE-vax)

Freeze-dried   formaldehyde-inactivated virus Full effect after   third dose; to be completed ten days before travel
Meningitis A and C   (various) Purified extract   meningococcal polysaccharide 10 to 14 days
Measles, Mumps,   Rubella (MMR) Live, attenuated   lyophilized viral strains 6 weeks; booster dose   3 to 5 years later
Polio (various) Formaldehyde-inactivated   virus Effective after third   dose of primary course; immediate on receipt of booster
Tetanus (various) Tetanus toxoid   adsorbed onto aluminum phosphate Effective after third   dose of primary course; immediate on receipt of booster
Typhoid oral   (Vivotif) Live, attenuated Salmonella   typhii Effective seven to 10   days after last dose

Typhoid intramuscular

(various)

Salmonella typhii extracted from   bacteria capsule formulated as a polysaccharide vaccine Effective after 10   days; booster dose every 2 years if re-exposure expected

Tick-borne   encephalitis

(FSME-IMMUN)

Killed virus Effective   approximately one week after second dose

Yellow fever

(YF-Vax)

Live attenuated

10 days (not   available to community pharmacies; must by ordered by designated Travel   Clinics

such as Grand Avenue)

Advice for Life, June 30, 2016

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Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a very important vitamin-like antioxidant that was not discovered until 1988. It is not a true vitamin however because it can actually be made by your body and it is not considered to be a critical element in the human diet. However, many would argue that it is critical as a supplement for its role in protecting human health! In fact it is often called ‘the king of free radical fighters’ because it is currently the only known antioxidant that is both fat and water soluble. Free radicals are highly reactive and very unstable molecules that can damage our body tissues. Free radicals are produced by or found in environmental pollution, cigarette smoke, medications, alcohol, illness and stress. The need for powerful antioxidants in our day to day lives is therefore extremely important as we are constantly exposed to very large amounts of free radicals.

ALA is an interesting antioxidant because it is easily absorbed through the walls of our cell membranes and is thus able to protect against free radical oxidative damage to the proteins and DNA structures inside our cells. Once inside the cell, ALA breaks down further to a complicated sounding type of antioxidant called dihydrolipoic acid. This new form of ALA is able to wipe out damaging superoxide, hydroperoxy and hydroxyl radicals. As we get older we produce less of our own antioxidants and we are less and less able to make and recycle key antioxidants like vitamin E, vitamin C and co-enzyme Q-10. ALA is really unique because it actually regenerates these and other antioxidants, helping them to stay longer in the body and continue their work neutralizing free radicals. Several clinical trials have shown that while most antioxidants are not able to protect against the vascular damage of diabetes, ALA is believed to be an exception. !

CanPrev’s Alpha Lipoic Acid 600 provides a therapeutic 600 mg dose of a safe and stable form of ALA. The formula is supported with thiamine and biotin, as these nutrients in particular can either be deficient or compete with each other for absorption into cells. Studies show that those with thiamine deficiencies can experience toxic side effects if high doses of ALA are taken without the support of thiamine. A biotin deficiency can occur due to high dosing with ALA as they both seem to compete with each other to get across the cell wall. ALA usually wins out and a deficiency can occur unless extra biotin is taken.

Advice for Life, June 30, 2016

on . Posted in Advice For Life

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a very important vitamin-like antioxidant that was not discovered until 1988. It is not a true vitamin however because it can actually be made by your body and it is not considered to be a critical element in the human diet. However, many would argue that it is critical as a supplement for its role in protecting human health! In fact it is often called ‘the king of free radical fighters’ because it is currently the only known antioxidant that is both fat and water soluble. Free radicals are highly reactive and very unstable molecules that can damage our body tissues. Free radicals are produced by or found in environmental pollution, cigarette smoke, medications, alcohol, illness and stress. The need for powerful antioxidants in our day to day lives is therefore extremely important as we are constantly exposed to very large amounts of free radicals.

ALA is an interesting antioxidant because it is easily absorbed through the walls of our cell membranes and is thus able to protect against free radical oxidative damage to the proteins and DNA structures inside our cells. Once inside the cell, ALA breaks down further to a complicated sounding type of antioxidant called dihydrolipoic acid. This new form of ALA is able to wipe out damaging superoxide, hydroperoxy and hydroxyl radicals. As we get older we produce less of our own antioxidants and we are less and less able to make and recycle key antioxidants like vitamin E, vitamin C and co-enzyme Q-10. ALA is really unique because it actually regenerates these and other antioxidants, helping them to stay longer in the body and continue their work neutralizing free radicals. Several clinical trials have shown that while most antioxidants are not able to protect against the vascular damage of diabetes, ALA is believed to be an exception. !

CanPrev’s Alpha Lipoic Acid 600 provides a therapeutic 600 mg dose of a safe and stable form of ALA. The formula is supported with thiamine and biotin, as these nutrients in particular can either be deficient or compete with each other for absorption into cells. Studies show that those with thiamine deficiencies can experience toxic side effects if high doses of ALA are taken without the support of thiamine. A biotin deficiency can occur due to high dosing with ALA as they both seem to compete with each other to get across the cell wall. ALA usually wins out and a deficiency can occur unless extra biotin is taken.

Travel Clinic/Vaccinations

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Grand Avenue Pharmacy - Cochrane Alberta

 

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Grand Avenue Pharmacy - Cochrane,Alberta

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Grand Avenue Pharmacy - Cochrane Alberta

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